Dress of the Week: Enzoani “Indira”

Our featured “Dress of the Week” is the “Indira” by Enzoani.

We have been enamored of sleeves recently, and this gown caught our attention. The way “Indira”  fits, tying around the waist really flatters a woman’s beautiful curves.

We also love the sweetheart bodice complimented by the sheer lace neckline. When looking closely at the details you can see just how delicate the carefully embroidered fabric is.

Indira_Fro_D

Photo courtesy of Enzoani

We admire the long train this dress provides! There is nothing like walking down the aisle and having the drama of a beautiful long train of gorgeous fabric behind you.

Indira_Fro_Bel-1

Photo courtesy of Enzoani

The plunging back adds the right amount of sexy to a classic shape.

Indira_Bac

Photo courtesy of Enzoani

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XO- Amanda 🙂

Reem Acra “Divine Girl”

We are proud to feature the “Divine Girl” wedding gown by Reem Acra for our “Dress of the Week.”

We are loving this strapless dress we’ve selected from Reem Acra‘s Spring 2014 collection.

I especially love how the triangular lace design reveals and defines the torso while bestowing a slimming effect at the waist. And be sure to take a close look at that lace to truly appreciate the gorgeous design chosen by Reem Acra for this dress in particular.

Also, the way the fabric overlaps as it wraps around the bust adds still another level of elegance to this gown.

This is an exceptional dress for the bride who wants to feel like a princess, yet still flaunt an edgy-meets-classy air.

Look 11 - 5145 - Divine Girl (1)

Photo Courtesy of Reem Acra

For more stunning dresses by Reem Acra please visit

http://www.reemacra.com

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xo,

Amanda

Eloquent Etiquette

The New Year is upon us and it’s time for a new segment, Eloquent Etiquette. We thought we’d expand our view to not only focus on creating exciting events and delightful details, but to also advise as to how to make formal party interactions and customs less foreign and daunting.

This week we found a great article, courtesy of Allure Magazine. “How to Make a Fabulous Party Conversation” caught our attention because it’s clear concise and gives you different topics and techniques to include or excuse yourself. Enjoy!

How to Make Fabulous Party Conversation

December 31, 2010

New Year’s Eve is one of those high-pressure party evenings: You know it’s coming for, well…a year, and you’re supposed to have the time of your life. But when you find yourself talking to people you met just moments ago—and might end up kissing when the countdown ends—there’s nothing like enforced fun to kill a conversation. Here’s how not to let it fizzle:

  • Do a little homework. Read a few online newspapers and peruse blogs like Gawker andHuffington Post. That way, if someone brings up current events, you can ask a few strategic questions to get him talking. When you know what kind of guests you’ll be mingling with, it’s easier to focus your reading. “If it’s going to be a lot of investment bankers, the odds are that talk will turn to government oversight of Wall Street,” says Deborah Roberts, an ABC News reporter. “And you can keep that in mind as you read the paper that week.”
  • Avoid the obvious. Don’t be intimidated by someone because of their job or reputation; just find out what interests him when he’s not at work. “Powerful people have hobbies, too, and they like to talk about them as much as anyone else does,” says writer Julia Reed, who has made small talk with senators and presidents.
  • Ask for recommendations. People love to be asked about their favorite finds. Ingrid Sischy, a writer and the former editor-in-chief of Interview magazine, fishes for advice she can use on her next vacation or night out. “I’m always trying to find out great new places, great restaurants, great books,” she says. “Some of the best things I’ve done, I learned about at dinner parties.”
  • Push some buttons. “Feel free to be wildly interrogative and ask profound questions,” says Simon Doonan, creative director of Barneys New York and the author of Nasty: My Family and other Glamorous Varmints. “For example, ‘How’s your relationship with your mother these days?’; ‘When was the last time you cried?’ Fellow guests will think you’re insane, but the answers are never boring.”
  • Know when to make your escape. If you’re really getting nowhere with the small talk, then extract yourself. “I often do the discrete handoff,” says event planner Deborah Williamson. “I’ll see a group of friends and introduce the person to everyone. After a few minutes, I’ll excuse myself and dash off.” If that fails, fake it. “I pretend to look for someone specific,” says Marjorie Gubelmann, a New York City social fixture who goes to countless parties every year. “I’ll say, ‘I’m looking for Dorothy—it’s always Dorothy. And then a few minutes later, I’ll apologize, excuse myself, and leave to go find Dorothy.” And the last resort? “Apologize and say you must find the ladies’ room,” says Gubelmann. Go in (even if it’s just to apply lipstick), then bump into someone else on your way out.

For this article and others at Allure Magazine:

http://www.allure.com/beauty/blogs/reporter/2010/12/how-to-start-a-conversation.html

From CUE to YOU

We at CUE couldn’t let the New Year roll in without taking the time to say THANK YOU.  We owe so much to our amazing clients, talented vendors our friends, families and everyone out there who supports us in what we do.  We are so proud of the events we create and produce and feel lucky to be able to wake up every day and know that we get to go to work with people we love and respect.

This year has been a whirlwind!  Every event was unique. We faced many challenges, overcame many obstacles and were rewarded with seamless, beautiful and fabulous events at the end of the day.
We’re so excited about what 2011 will hold for us and look forward to sharing it with you!

Wishing you peace, prosperity, love and happiness in the New Year.

xoxo,

Danielle and the CUE team

 

Giving Thanks

I am thankful for so many things:  my daughter, my husband, my family and friends, my company and my amazing girls that stand by me and help it run.  The list could go on and on.  Today, it’s so important to stand back, look at the big picture and remember how much we have rather than dwell on the things we wish we had.
Last year at this time, my daughter was very sick and we were told it was best not to bring her to my parents’ house and possibly infect others for Thanksgiving.  I was so upset to not be able to enjoy my mother’s cooking and see my family.  But then I realized I had family right where I was.  My husband came home with a turkey and Emily and I decided we would cook the dinner ourselves.  It was an awesome holiday.  I was surrounded by people I love, I learned how to make a turkey (tedious, but not as hard as everyone makes it out to be), and we all had a wonderful time enjoying each other’s company (and the wine and food!).
Not every holiday needs to be a big event.  The important thing is that you’re surrounded by the people you love and that you remember how fortunate you are in the little things you have.
All of us here at CUE wish you and yours a very happy and healthy holiday and remind you all to enjoy the simple things life brings us.

xoxo,

Danielle

The 1st turkey I ever made - in my tiny NY apartment kitchen

Gobble Gobble Time!

Every year as Thanksgiving approaches, you begin to consider many things: “What do I do first? How should I decorate? What should be on my menu? Dare I attempt the Turducken?” With that in mind we at CUE thought it might be nice to offer a few suggestions to help you get in the Thanksgiving spirit.

First, let’s start with a craft project.  A cute way to spice up your Thanksgiving table is to create a Turkey Bread Basket.

Turkey Breadbasket Centerpiece

Courtesy of Familyfun.go.com

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Large wooden spoon
  • Tacky glue and a glue stick
  • Pair of googly eyes
  • Pencil and scissors
  • Construction paper in a variety of colors
  • Flat wooden craft spoon
  • Red marker
  • Colorful printed wrapping paper or pages from old magazines
  • Waxed paper
  • Thin wooden skewers (sold in the kitchen/cooking section of most grocery and department stores)
  • Basket to serve as the turkey’s body (it should be large enough to fit a loaf of bread or dinner rolls)
  • Florists’ foam or Styrofoam block (sold at many large craft or department stores) large enough to wedge into the basket
  • Cloth dinner napkin
Instructions
  1. To create the turkey’s head, turn the large wooden spoon so that the back of the bowl becomes the face. Use tacky glue to stick on the googly eyes. Then cut out a yellow construction paper beak and glue it in place.
  2. For the turkey’s wattle, use the marker to color the flat wooden craft spoon red. Glue the wattle onto the face at an angle so that the top slightly overlaps the beak. You can use a pinch-style clothespin to hold the pieces in place until the glue dries.
  3. From the construction paper, help your kids cut out lots of colored feathers that measure about 10 inches long and 1 3/4 inches across at the widest point. Cut out the same number of feathers from the wrapping paper or magazine pages, then trim them so that they are slightly smaller than the solid-colored ones.
  4. Cover a flat work surface with waxed paper (this makes for easier cleanup after applying glue), and you’re ready to assemble the feathers. For each one, place a construction paper cutout on the waxed paper and set a wooden skewer atop it so that the blunt end is just below the top of the paper and the pointed end extends about 3 inches below it.
  5. Next, use a glue stick to coat the underside of a printed feather. Then press it, glued side down, onto the construction paper feather, sandwiching the skewer between the 2 layers.
  6. Wedge the foam block into the basket (trim it first if necessary). Push the spoon handle into one end of the block deep enough to secure it. Stick the feathers into the opposite end. Cover the block with the cloth napkin, and the turkey basket is ready to fill with bread.

If you are  in the mood for a more elegant meal, then consider using a few leaves from your yard to create a subtle fall theme. Display autumn leaves beneath a sheer tablecloth and the dining room will look as brilliant as the trees in your front yard. First, place leaves between paper towels or waxed paper inside a phone book for a week to dry and smooth them. Next, if needed, use double-sided tape to attach foliage — in any grouping — to a standard white tablecloth. Then place a sheer cloth, such as organza, on top.

Courtesy of MarthaStewart.com

You might also want to use a leaf or a sweet-gum-tree spur as a place card. Just tie a name tag with a bit of ribbon to the stem of your chosen item.

Courtesy of MarthaStewart.com

Finally, no Thanksgiving is complete without a bit o’ Pumpkin Pie. It’s a guaranteed crowd pleaser. Follow the recipe below.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Ingredients

  • 1 (9 inch) unbaked deep dish pie crust
  • 3/4 cup white sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 (15 ounce) can of 100% Pure Pumpkin or Pumpkin Puree
  • 1 (12 fluid ounce) can NESTLE® CARNATION® Evaporated Milk

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
  2. Combine sugar, salt, cinnamon, ginger and cloves in small bowl. Beat eggs lightly in large bowl. Stir in pumpkin and sugar-spice mixture. Gradually stir in evaporated milk. Pour into pie shell.
  3. Bake for 15 minutes. Reduce temperature to 350 degrees F.; bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cool on wire rack for 2 hours. Serve immediately or refrigerate. (Do not freeze as this will cause the crust to separate from the filling.)

Libby's(R) Famous Pumpkin Pie Recipe

Courtesy of AllRecipes.com

But remember, no matter what decor you choose or how many delicious treats you taste, Thanksgiving is ultimately about being grateful for the ones we care about and the meaning they bring to our lives. So, this Thanksgiving make sure to put a little extra TLC (Tender Loving Care) into each project or dish and it will certainly shine through to your loved ones!

Happy Mother’s Day

I wanted to take a moment to wish all of you amazing women out there a Happy Mother’s Day. This is the second Mother’s Day that I get to celebrate as a mother myself. I can only hope that I’m living up to the example my mother set for me. Moms are so many things to so many people—we are strong, multi-tasking, role models. My mother has been my friend, my support system, my psychiatrist, my nurse, and most importantly the inspiration for who I am. It is because of this super woman that I knew that I could have the strength to be in the event industry and still be a mom. Both of these things are full time jobs and as an event planner I am detail oriented, so I need to put 150% into everything I do, I couldn’t do any of this without her inspiration. So let’s all celebrate the amazing women who molded us into who we are today!

xoxo,

Danielle